The Hague
City of Peace, justice and Security

The Hague proudly claims the title of the city of Peace, Justice and Security. It is the seat of government, home of the Dutch monarchy, NATO, the International Criminal Court, embassies and consulates from around the world, plus hundreds of organisations, multinational companies, knowledge centres and think tanks. 

International environment

The Hague proudly claims the title of the city of Peace, Justice and Security. It is the seat of government, home of the Dutch monarchy, NATO, the International Criminal Court, embassies and consulates from around the world, plus hundreds of organisations, multinational companies, knowledge centres and think tanks. 

A coffee with the prime minister

The Hague is home to both the government of the Netherlands and the King, so don’t be surprised if you find our prime minister sitting next to you while you’re having a cappuccino. If you pass by Noordeinde Palace, you can see for yourself if the King is working.

What you need to know about… The Hague
38museums
residents546.000
200internationalorganisations
Lorem ipsumLorem ipsumshops2.750
restaur ants 500
70 beach pavilions

A city full of art and culture

With the most historic sites per square metre in the Netherlands, The Hague oozes culture and history. Gazing straight into the eyes of Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring at the Mauritshuis museum is just a beautiful, five-minute-walk away from losing all sense of perspective at Escher in Het Paleis. Go on from there to discover Madurodam, where you’ll find the whole of Netherlands at your feet (in miniature).

bachelors.universiteitleiden.nl/city-the-hague
Must sees in The Hague

Vermeer’s Girl
with a Pearl Earring

The Mondriaan
collection

The Peace
Palace

‘When my eight-year-old self was allowed to choose an instrument at the music school, the trumpet immediately jumped out at me. It’s a piece of iron that is an extension of your vocal cords: I found that fascinating. I still play the trumpet, now with a group of fellow students. We mainly play jazz. I enjoy the melodies and variation of jazz, and I like to attend jazz concerts.

During my studies, I focused mainly on Japanese art and history. I wrote my thesis on jazz in pre-war Japan, mainly in the Taisho period. That period is not often linked to jazz but, contrary to expectations, Western jazz could already be found in Japanese cities by 1920. I learned a lot about art and culture during my bachelor’s programme. A management position in the cultural sector would be nice. I secretly hope to end up working for a cultural institution in Japan, but a concert hall, a museum or another cultural institution in the Netherlands would also be cool.’

Cas de Boorder
Loves to play jazz